Lent (v)

A break from poking at scabs and healing wounds during this Lenten blogging for my QT dead. It’s alternatively a bit uncomfortably vulnerable, and based on prior accidents, risks getting the attention of you-know-Who. So, from the depths of my documents for chatting with my QT dead (“T 2015”), an entry from January touched on a flag blanket.

At the time, I was spitballing the different purposes for such a blanket:

It could serve as the representation of the flag for rituals, and things could be planned to be on it (sacred cloth on the ground, perhaps, more so than an altar cloth, but it just depends). In ritual, it could also provide a feeling of safety as a blanket, which could be strengthening or bond-building when it comes to sharing and passing the blanket from one person to the next. I might be able to get one per person even, so that everyone can bring their own to a ritual and use it at home (partially as community building).

Have I ever actually taken part in a group ritual? Do I have access to a group of people who would even want a flag blanket after a ritual took place? Do I have access to non-pagans who would want a flag blanket? No, on all fronts. However, that’s just how some of the speculative entries rolled (coming up with solo and potential group ideas).

At the time, I was specifically focused on an idea around the trans flag as a blanket, but honestly, this could be as general (a rainbow flag for the whole LGBTQIA+ community) or specific as someone wanted to get. Change up the size for a small personal shrine, make a table runner, join together a bunch of different flags, loads of possibilities.

Mystery Yarn

Surprise! Your grandmother has been cleaning out the dusty corners of her house and the spiders have gifted her with yarn that has been labeled and yarn that has not.

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1 skein, 3.5 oz, of Lion Brand Sayelle (Discontinued). Color: Pastel Yellow. Weight: Worsted / 4 ply.

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1 skein, 4 oz, of unknown brand. Color: Pastel chartreuse (discolored portions are dust, I think). Weight: Worsted (probably).

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A bag of miscellaneous:

  • A ball (amount and weight unknown) of white yarn with sparkly interwoven bits.
  • Darice (Nylon Plus *), 2 ply, 20 yds apiece of – Black, Blue, Yellow, Green, Red, and Gold (label removed and in a ball).

* 100% nylon needlecraft yarn. “The quality standard for plastic, woven, and knitted canvas.” It feels stiffer (coarser?) than what I’m used to. Is this for those ‘oversized needle and sew the design we’ve provided’ projects (sort of like embroidery on steroids)? ((I have no idea what to do with this bag.))

Irish Hiking Scarf

While I initially wrote that I was going to just add on sequences for that prayer shawl (Bargain Matinee Prayer Shawl), I decided to give double stranding a try just to see the visual difference. It’s . . . a lot more attention that I have to give to the act of knitting and purling than I’m used to, so I finished the scarf I started after those fingerless gloves instead.

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Pattern by Adrian Bizilia

As opposed to the mitts I finished not that long ago, I didn’t make unintentional or intentional changes to the pattern, so I’m not making a point of sharing it. Reminder: It’s a free pattern to download at the link above.

The only thing that I didn’t really think about was that the type of color variation in this yarn was different than what I’ve used previously. I’ve used a Red Heart yarn that switched from color 1 to 2 to 3, back to 1, and repeated in that way. This almost looks like I knit with a bunch of individual colors that I joined together as I went. (My family still thinks it looks alright, and this is a gift for a relative, so I’m not overly concerned with it. Just something to keep in mind when I ask someone to pick out a color changing yarn for Xmas to work with.)

Irish Hiking Mitts (Right)

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Pic of left and right fingerless gloves and the leftover yarn (unweighed = Idk how much much).

Part II: I didn’t lose quite as much time getting the process of knitting in-the-round down, but I still wasn’t exactly thrilled with the right one.

Pattern by iknit2purl2

C4B: Slip 2 sts onto cable needle (CN) and place at back of work. K2 then K2 from CN.

Notation: I realize it saves space in the pattern to just make a note to repeat rows, but I mentally can’t save that in my immediate attention when also concentrating on the row pattern, repeating the correct row three more times, juggling needles, and not completing this in one sitting. My handwritten copy of the pattern therefore has a few notes about that (reflected below).

Alteration: It kinda looks like I’m trying to wear something I’ve outgrown if I stop at row 44, so I went to 47 (BO instead of 48), which matches what I did in the left one. In this one specifically, I wanted to avoid picking up stitches for the thumb (indicated below).

Briar’s Right Pattern

CO 42 sts and divide among 3 needles.

Row 1: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 5 times.

Rows 2 – 4: Repeat Row 1.

Row 5: {K1, P1, C4B, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, knit to next to the last stitch, P1}.

Row 6: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, knit to the next to the last stitch, P1}.

Rows 7 – 9: Repeat Row 6.

Row 10: Repeat Row 5.

Repeat Rows 6 – 10 three more times (cable row bolded):

11, 12, 13, 14, (15)

16, 17, 18, 19, (20)

21, 22, 23, 24, (25)

Right Hand Thumb Increases

Row 26: Work Row 6 pattern for 23 sts, place Marker, M1, K1, M1, place Marker, knit to end of row.

Row 27: Work Row 6 for 23 sts, slip Marker, K3, slip Marker, knit to end of row.

Row 28: Work Row 6 for 23 sts, slip Marker, M1, K3, M1, slip Marker, knit to end of row.

Repeat increases until there are 13 sts inside the Markers:

29: Work established pattern, K5 inside Markers.

30: Cable row. M1, K5, M1

31: Work est, K7 inside Markers.

32: M1, K7, M1

33: Work est, K9 inside Markers.

34: M1, K9, M1

35: Cable row. Work est until Marker 1, M1, slip Marker, K11, slip Marker 2, M1, knit to end of row. (There are now 43 sts outside Markers.)

36: M1, K11, M1. (Knit extra sts according to pattern.)

Row 37: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 2 times. K1, P1, K extra st, remove Marker 1, slip 13 sts onto stitch holder. Temporarily transfer extra st onto old needle, replace Marker 1, transfer extra st onto new needle, remove Marker 2, K extra st, place Marker 2, knit to the end of row. (There should be 41 sts on DPNs and 2 sts in between Markers.)

Rows 38: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 2 times. K1, P1, slip Marker 1, K2, slip Marker 2, knit to end of row.

Row 39: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 2 times. K1, P1, remove Marker 1, slip 2 sts onto extra DPN, remover Marker 2, knit to end of row. (There should be 41 sts on DPNs.)

Row 40: {K1, P1, C4B, P1}; repeat 2 times. K1, P1, knit to end of row.

Work as established:

41, 42, 43

Row 44: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 4 times. {K1, P1, K4} to adjust for 41 sts.

Row 45: {K1, P1, C4B, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, K4}.

Rows 46 – 47: Repeat Row 44.

BO

Thumb

Remove 13 sts from stitch holder and place evenly over 3 needles. Add 2 extra sts from DPN to the beginning and the end of the new row. K15. Knit 2 more rows, BO. I’m not sure if something got turned around, and I knit against the grain, in a manner of speaking, but the thumb didn’t turn out quite right.

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Back (left) and front (right) sides of right fingerless glove. The transfer back to the extra purling can be seen at the top of the palm (feels more noticeable than it looks), and somehow the thumb got a bit…unique.

Bargain Matinee Prayer Shawl (wip)

Right now, this project is sort of just chilling at the bottom of my bag with its huge skein.

Pattern by Alice’s Embrace

From the start, I knew this wasn’t going to be exactly as written because I have US 8 circular needles (not 13) and I want to use the 14 oz worsted skein from my stash (instead of bulky yarn). However, I still cast on as written [58] because I wasn’t 100% sure just how different what I have would turn out to be, so I’m at a place where I can more clearly see that this is a glorified scarf in width right now.

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I dropped a stitch and messed up the whole pattern at an earlier point, so I mentally need the stitch markers to keep track of where I am. I also didn’t actually do 10 rows for the top border seen here.

I don’t particularly want to knit a scarf this long, so I’m debating what to do. I can’t really escape committing to frogging, but I want to know what I’m going to do before I start the very easy process of unraveling.

Option 1: Try double stranding. Because I don’t have enough of this yarn for the full length (58 in, not including borders), I’d have to adjust to a shorter length.

Option 2: Cast on extra stitches so I can do more sequences. Yeah, I might have to go with a bit of a shorter length, but I don’t think it’ll be quite as drastic as with double stranding.

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I hadn’t planned on sharing my notes when I wrote this out (sorry).

For someone who isn’t terribly fond of math, I picked a hobby with some math in it. As you can see in my representation of what’s happening in the pattern of knitting stitches together and yarn overs, I have to stick with adding a multiple of 12. Adding 4 or 5 sequences is going to be awfully close to just double stranding, but 1 or 2 barely seems noticeable. I think 3 sequences will get me close to the 20 in width this shawl is supposed to be aiming for.

CO 94.

K5 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1 – K5

Irish Hiking Mitts (Left)

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Pic of left and right fingerless gloves and the leftover yarn (unweighed = Idk how much much).

A reasonable person might be wondering why I’ve split my fingerless gloves into two posts when they should pretty much be the same. I was focusing more on figuring out how to handle DPNs for the first time, and I messed up on the first one.

Pattern by iknit2purl2

C4B: Slip 2 sts onto cable needle (CN) and place at back of work. K2 then K2 from CN.

Mistake: I did not follow the instruction to {K1, P1, knit to next to the last stitch, P1} in rows 5 and 6, and because repeating those two rows is 95% of the project, I stayed consistent when I realized my mistake so it would look intentional.

Newbie Struggle: Picking up stitches and starting to knit a new section (reflected in thumb portion).

Notation: I realize it saves space in the pattern to just make a note to repeat rows, but I mentally can’t save that in my immediate attention when also concentrating on the row pattern, repeating the correct row three more times, juggling needles, and not completing this in one sitting. My handwritten copy of the pattern therefore has a few notes about that (reflected below).

Alteration: It kinda looks like I’m trying to wear something I’ve outgrown if I stop at row 44, so I went to 47 (BO instead of 48).

Briar’s Left Pattern

CO 42 sts and divide among 3 needles.

Row 1: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 5 times.

Rows 2 – 4: Repeat Row 1.

Row 5: {K1, P1, C4B, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat once.

Row 6 – 9: Repeat Row 1.

Row 10: Repeat Row 5.

Repeat Rows 6 – 10 three more times (cable row bolded):

11, 12, 13, 14, (15)

16, 17, 18, 19, (20)

21, 22, 23, 24, (25)

Left Hand Thumb Increases

Row 26: Work Row 1 pattern for 40 sts, place Marker, M1, K1, M1, place Marker. Returned to Row 1 pattern to end with {P1}.

Row 27: Work Row 1 for 40 sts, slip Marker, K3, slip Marker, P1.

Row 28: Work Row 1 for 40 sts, slip Marker, M1, K3, M1, slip Marker, P1.

Repeat increases until there are 13 sts inside the Markers:

29: Work established pattern, K5 inside Markers.

30: Cable row. M1, K5, M1

31: Work est, K7 inside Markers.

32: M1, K7, M1

33: Work est, K9 inside Markers.

34: M1, K9, M1

35: Cable row. Work est, K11 inside Markers.

36: M1, K11, M1

Row 37: Work established pattern to Markers. Remove Marker 1, slip 13 sts onto stitch holder, remove Marker 2, return to Row 1 pattern to end with {P1}. (There should be 41 sts on DPNs.)

Rows 38 – 39: {K1, P1, K4, P1}; repeat 4 times. {K1, P1, K3, P1} to adjust for 41 sts.

Row 40: {K1, P1, C4B, P1}; repeat 2 times. {K1, P1, K4, P1}. {K1, P1, K3, P1} to adjust for 41 sts.

Work as established:

41, 42, 43, 44, (45)

46, 47, BO

Thumb

Remove 13 sts from stitch holder and place evenly over 3 needles. Struggle to pick up a stitch in the gap between thumb and hand, CO the other stitch. Starting with the CO stitch and ending with the picked up stitch, K15. Knit 2 more rows, BO.

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Top (left) and bottom (right) view of left fingerless glove. You can see the two lines of the purling from the last two repeated sections across the palm side (from mistake).

Knitting Goals for 2019

From my queue [all patterns are free]:

1) Irish Hiking Scarf by Adrian Bizilia

US 8 straight/single point needles, a cable needle. Yarn: Worsted, 350 yds (~7 oz). I plan on using: 1 skein, 7 oz (355 yds) of Yarn Bee Sugarwheel Colorway: Minted Macaroon. Weight: Worsted.

 

Gift for my grandma.

2) Irish Hiking Mitts by iknit2purl2

Require DPNs (US 6). Yarn: Worsted, 150 – 220 yds (~5 oz). I plan on using: 1 skein, 5 oz (232 yds) of Yarn Bee Soft & Sleek Solids Colorway: Kale. Weight: Worsted.

 

Project for myself because no one in my family will use them (fingerless gloves).

3) Bargain Matinee Prayer Shawl by Alice’s Embrace

Pattern calls for US 13 circular needles and bulky yarn. Use US 8 circular needles and something from my stash – that one skein someone gifted me back in 2015 that I still need to use – 1 skein, 14 oz (744 yds) of Red Heart Super Saver Solids Colorway: Cherry. Weight: Worsted / 4 / Medium.

I’m not entirely sure what I’ll be doing with this shawl once I’m done (I don’t have double the yardage in order to double up on the yarn, which basically creates the end result of bulky yarn when only using worsted). Because it won’t be similar to the size and proportion of the desired end result, it’s not going to be applicable for donating to Alice’s Embrace (their About).

4) Figure out what on earth I’m doing to do with my Mystery Yarn (one 3 oz skein of black worsted, two 2 oz skeins of fuzzy aqua probably worsted something or other).

5) Endometriosis Shawl by Caitlin Shepherd

I plan on using: 1 skein, 7 oz (355 yds) of Yarn Bee Sugarwheel Colorway: Grape Jamboree. Weight: Worsted.

 

I’m honestly not quite sure what I’ll do with it, but I’m hoping I’ll be able to handle the lace alright.

Knitting Gifts (Yarn)

Similarly to the needle post, I came up with my Xmas list on paper because I know how my family likes to shop in store for the holidays. I wanted them to get some say in the color, as long as they got the appropriate weight (4 / Medium) and bought enough, and in the past, we’ve easily been able to pick up Red Heart (Super Saver) in Walmart. (Are there better stores to shop at and/or types of yarn to use? Probably, but Walmart is closer to us, and RH is cheaper to buy than some other options.)

However, when it came to this trip to get yarn, I had to deal with unexpectedly needing to help them look in a different store because our local Walmart decided to cut back on their yarn aisle for Xmas crafty stuff. {The different store in question is not a store that some queer people like to support, but it was the next closest option.} I went in with the goal of: 1) a 7 oz, multicolored skein, 2) a 5 oz, any singular shade of green skein, and 3) a 7 oz, blue gradient skein.

I wound up getting:

1 skein, 7 oz (355 yds) of Yarn Bee Sugarwheel Colorway: Grape Jamboree

1 skein, 7 oz (355 yds) of Yarn Bee Sugarwheel Colorway: Minted Macaroon

1 skein, 5 oz (232 yds) of Yarn Bee Soft & Sleek Solids Colorway: Kale

Surprise! Grandma also decided to hand over some random yarn that was in a box bought at an auction at some point. Everything will have an aura of having been bought before you were born. One will have a label (phew), but one is simply Mystery Yarn.

Labeled:

1 skein, 3 oz, of Lion Brand (black). Weight: Worsted / 4 ply.

Mystery Yarn:

2 skeins, each of 2 oz of Mystery Yarn (aqua). Weight: Worsted? Idk, it’s fuzzy and I’m kinda not a fan.

Knitting Gifts (Needles)

I came up with my Xmas list on paper because I know how my family likes to shop in store for the holidays, but I didn’t really think ahead to sharing the specifics of what I got after they decided to order this online instead. So.

Why get a wide variety? I only have a pair each of single point aluminum needles in US 6 and US 8. I need US 7 needles of some sort, I want to compare DPNs (Double Pointed Needles) and circular needles, and I want to try wooden needles.

Anyone who has ever tried to google circular knitting needles: Why didn’t you just get an interchangeable set? You’ll have a variety of cable lengths and the interchangeable ends will cover a range of needle sizes.

Me: Their cost. I have no idea if I’ll even like this type of needle, I’m not sure if I have a preference for plastic/aluminum/wood, and cost. Do you know how expensive it can get to try to buy knitting needles when you’re just starting out?

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Needles

Circular, US 8, aluminum. Example lists 16 in, but I got a 36 in. Boye.

DPNs, US 6, aluminum, 7 in. Example is US 7. Boye.

DPNs, US 7, wood (bamboo), 7 in. Clover/Takumi.

Straight / Single Point, US 7, wood (bamboo). Example is 9 in, but I got 13 in. Clover/Takumi.

Knitting History

I started sometime in undergrad with a Boye kit as a Xmas gift (I think it was 2015).

“I Taught Myself To Knit” Kit includes:

  • 1 book (beginner instructions and 18 patterns)
  • 2 pairs of 10 in. straight aluminum knitting needles (sizes 6 and 8)
  • 2 tapestry yarn needles
  • 2 point protectors
  • Cable needle
  • Stitch holder
  • Stitch counter
  • Knit gauge
  • Stitch markers

My past projects have mostly been vaguely scarf-like lengths of knitted fabric or acceptable scarves, including a cable scarf from the Boye book in a dark purple (for my mom), another scarf of that pattern in light purple (for my sister), and a freeform scarf to practice knitting with two colors that didn’t turn out half bad (olive green and white, kept for myself).